DoubleUtil.cs source code in C# .NET

Source code for the .NET framework in C#

                        

Code:

/ Dotnetfx_Vista_SP2 / Dotnetfx_Vista_SP2 / 8.0.50727.4016 / DEVDIV / depot / DevDiv / releases / Orcas / QFE / wpf / src / Shared / MS / Internal / DoubleUtil.cs / 1 / DoubleUtil.cs

                            //---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
//
// Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.
//
// File: DoubleUtil.cs 
//
// Description: This file contains the implementation of DoubleUtil, which 
//              provides "fuzzy" comparison functionality for doubles and 
//              double-based classes and structs in our code.
// 
// History:
//  04/28/2003 : adsmith - Created
//  05/20/2003 : adsmith - Moved it to Shared, so Base, Core and Framework can all share.
// 
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
using System; 
using System.Windows;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices; 

#if WINDOWS_BASE
    using MS.Internal.WindowsBase;
#elif PRESENTATION_CORE 
    using MS.Internal.PresentationCore;
#elif PRESENTATIONFRAMEWORK 
    using MS.Internal.PresentationFramework; 
#elif DRT
    using MS.Internal.Drt; 
#else
#error Attempt to use FriendAccessAllowedAttribute from an unknown assembly.
using MS.Internal.YourAssemblyName;
#endif 

namespace MS.Internal 
{ 
    [FriendAccessAllowed]
    internal static class DoubleUtil 
    {
        // Const values come from sdk\inc\crt\float.h
        internal const double DBL_EPSILON  =   2.2204460492503131e-016; /* smallest such that 1.0+DBL_EPSILON != 1.0 */
        internal const float  FLT_MIN      =   1.175494351e-38F; /* Number close to zero, where float.MinValue is -float.MaxValue */ 

        ///  
        /// AreClose - Returns whether or not two doubles are "close".  That is, whether or 
        /// not they are within epsilon of each other.  Note that this epsilon is proportional
        /// to the numbers themselves to that AreClose survives scalar multiplication. 
        /// There are plenty of ways for this to return false even for numbers which
        /// are theoretically identical, so no code calling this should fail to work if this
        /// returns false.  This is important enough to repeat:
        /// NB: NO CODE CALLING THIS FUNCTION SHOULD DEPEND ON ACCURATE RESULTS - this should be 
        /// used for optimizations *only*.
        ///  
        ///  
        /// bool - the result of the AreClose comparision.
        ///  
        ///  The first double to compare. 
        ///  The second double to compare. 
        public static bool AreClose(double value1, double value2)
        { 
            //in case they are Infinities (then epsilon check does not work)
            if(value1 == value2) return true; 
            // This computes (|value1-value2| / (|value1| + |value2| + 10.0)) < DBL_EPSILON 
            double eps = (Math.Abs(value1) + Math.Abs(value2) + 10.0) * DBL_EPSILON;
            double delta = value1 - value2; 
            return(-eps < delta) && (eps > delta);
        }

        ///  
        /// LessThan - Returns whether or not the first double is less than the second double.
        /// That is, whether or not the first is strictly less than *and* not within epsilon of 
        /// the other number.  Note that this epsilon is proportional to the numbers themselves 
        /// to that AreClose survives scalar multiplication.  Note,
        /// There are plenty of ways for this to return false even for numbers which 
        /// are theoretically identical, so no code calling this should fail to work if this
        /// returns false.  This is important enough to repeat:
        /// NB: NO CODE CALLING THIS FUNCTION SHOULD DEPEND ON ACCURATE RESULTS - this should be
        /// used for optimizations *only*. 
        /// 
        ///  
        /// bool - the result of the LessThan comparision. 
        /// 
        ///  The first double to compare.  
        ///  The second double to compare. 
        public static bool LessThan(double value1, double value2)
        {
            return (value1 < value2) && !AreClose(value1, value2); 
        }
 
 
        /// 
        /// GreaterThan - Returns whether or not the first double is greater than the second double. 
        /// That is, whether or not the first is strictly greater than *and* not within epsilon of
        /// the other number.  Note that this epsilon is proportional to the numbers themselves
        /// to that AreClose survives scalar multiplication.  Note,
        /// There are plenty of ways for this to return false even for numbers which 
        /// are theoretically identical, so no code calling this should fail to work if this
        /// returns false.  This is important enough to repeat: 
        /// NB: NO CODE CALLING THIS FUNCTION SHOULD DEPEND ON ACCURATE RESULTS - this should be 
        /// used for optimizations *only*.
        ///  
        /// 
        /// bool - the result of the GreaterThan comparision.
        /// 
        ///  The first double to compare.  
        ///  The second double to compare. 
        public static bool GreaterThan(double value1, double value2) 
        { 
            return (value1 > value2) && !AreClose(value1, value2);
        } 

        /// 
        /// LessThanOrClose - Returns whether or not the first double is less than or close to
        /// the second double.  That is, whether or not the first is strictly less than or within 
        /// epsilon of the other number.  Note that this epsilon is proportional to the numbers
        /// themselves to that AreClose survives scalar multiplication.  Note, 
        /// There are plenty of ways for this to return false even for numbers which 
        /// are theoretically identical, so no code calling this should fail to work if this
        /// returns false.  This is important enough to repeat: 
        /// NB: NO CODE CALLING THIS FUNCTION SHOULD DEPEND ON ACCURATE RESULTS - this should be
        /// used for optimizations *only*.
        /// 
        ///  
        /// bool - the result of the LessThanOrClose comparision.
        ///  
        ///  The first double to compare.  
        ///  The second double to compare. 
        public static bool LessThanOrClose(double value1, double value2) 
        {
            return (value1 < value2) || AreClose(value1, value2);
        }
 
        /// 
        /// GreaterThanOrClose - Returns whether or not the first double is greater than or close to 
        /// the second double.  That is, whether or not the first is strictly greater than or within 
        /// epsilon of the other number.  Note that this epsilon is proportional to the numbers
        /// themselves to that AreClose survives scalar multiplication.  Note, 
        /// There are plenty of ways for this to return false even for numbers which
        /// are theoretically identical, so no code calling this should fail to work if this
        /// returns false.  This is important enough to repeat:
        /// NB: NO CODE CALLING THIS FUNCTION SHOULD DEPEND ON ACCURATE RESULTS - this should be 
        /// used for optimizations *only*.
        ///  
        ///  
        /// bool - the result of the GreaterThanOrClose comparision.
        ///  
        ///  The first double to compare. 
        ///  The second double to compare. 
        public static bool GreaterThanOrClose(double value1, double value2)
        { 
            return (value1 > value2) || AreClose(value1, value2);
        } 
 
        /// 
        /// IsOne - Returns whether or not the double is "close" to 1.  Same as AreClose(double, 1), 
        /// but this is faster.
        /// 
        /// 
        /// bool - the result of the AreClose comparision. 
        /// 
        ///  The double to compare to 1.  
        public static bool IsOne(double value) 
        {
            return Math.Abs(value-1.0) < 10.0 * DBL_EPSILON; 
        }

        /// 
        /// IsZero - Returns whether or not the double is "close" to 0.  Same as AreClose(double, 0), 
        /// but this is faster.
        ///  
        ///  
        /// bool - the result of the AreClose comparision.
        ///  
        ///  The double to compare to 0. 
        public static bool IsZero(double value)
        {
            return Math.Abs(value) < 10.0 * DBL_EPSILON; 
        }
 
        // The Point, Size, Rect and Matrix class have moved to WinCorLib.  However, we provide 
        // internal AreClose methods for our own use here.
 
        /// 
        /// Compares two points for fuzzy equality.  This function
        /// helps compensate for the fact that double values can
        /// acquire error when operated upon 
        /// 
        /// The first point to compare 
        /// The second point to compare 
        /// Whether or not the two points are equal
        public static bool AreClose(Point point1, Point point2) 
        {
            return DoubleUtil.AreClose(point1.X, point2.X) &&
            DoubleUtil.AreClose(point1.Y, point2.Y);
        } 

        ///  
        /// Compares two Size instances for fuzzy equality.  This function 
        /// helps compensate for the fact that double values can
        /// acquire error when operated upon 
        /// 
        /// The first size to compare
        /// The second size to compare
        /// Whether or not the two Size instances are equal 
        public static bool AreClose(Size size1, Size size2)
        { 
            return DoubleUtil.AreClose(size1.Width, size2.Width) && 
                   DoubleUtil.AreClose(size1.Height, size2.Height);
        } 

        /// 
        /// Compares two Vector instances for fuzzy equality.  This function
        /// helps compensate for the fact that double values can 
        /// acquire error when operated upon
        ///  
        /// The first Vector to compare 
        /// The second Vector to compare
        /// Whether or not the two Vector instances are equal 
        public static bool AreClose(System.Windows.Vector vector1, System.Windows.Vector vector2)
        {
            return DoubleUtil.AreClose(vector1.X, vector2.X) &&
                   DoubleUtil.AreClose(vector1.Y, vector2.Y); 
        }
 
        ///  
        /// Compares two rectangles for fuzzy equality.  This function
        /// helps compensate for the fact that double values can 
        /// acquire error when operated upon
        /// 
        /// The first rectangle to compare
        /// The second rectangle to compare 
        /// Whether or not the two rectangles are equal
        public static bool AreClose(Rect rect1, Rect rect2) 
        { 
            // If they're both empty, don't bother with the double logic.
            if (rect1.IsEmpty) 
            {
                return rect2.IsEmpty;
            }
 
            // At this point, rect1 isn't empty, so the first thing we can test is
            // rect2.IsEmpty, followed by property-wise compares. 
 
            return (!rect2.IsEmpty) &&
                DoubleUtil.AreClose(rect1.X, rect2.X) && 
                DoubleUtil.AreClose(rect1.Y, rect2.Y) &&
                DoubleUtil.AreClose(rect1.Height, rect2.Height) &&
                DoubleUtil.AreClose(rect1.Width, rect2.Width);
        } 

        ///  
        /// 
        /// 
        ///  
        /// 
        public static bool IsBetweenZeroAndOne(double val)
        {
            return (GreaterThanOrClose(val, 0) && LessThanOrClose(val, 1)); 
        }
 
        ///  
        ///
        ///  
        /// 
        /// 
        public static int DoubleToInt(double val)
        { 
            return (0 < val) ? (int)(val + 0.5) : (int)(val - 0.5);
        } 
 

        ///  
        /// rectHasNaN - this returns true if this rect has X, Y , Height or Width as NaN.
        /// 
        /// The rectangle to test
        /// returns whether the Rect has NaN 
        public static bool RectHasNaN(Rect r)
        { 
            if (    DoubleUtil.IsNaN(r.X) 
                 || DoubleUtil.IsNaN(r.Y)
                 || DoubleUtil.IsNaN(r.Height) 
                 || DoubleUtil.IsNaN(r.Width) )
            {
                return true;
            } 
            return false;
        } 
 

#if !PBTCOMPILER 

        [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
        private struct NanUnion
        { 
            [FieldOffset(0)] internal double DoubleValue;
            [FieldOffset(0)] internal UInt64 UintValue; 
        } 

        // The standard CLR double.IsNaN() function is approximately 100 times slower than our own wrapper, 
        // so please make sure to use DoubleUtil.IsNaN() in performance sensitive code.
        // PS item that tracks the CLR improvement is DevDiv Schedule : 26916.
        // IEEE 754 : If the argument is any value in the range 0x7ff0000000000001L through 0x7fffffffffffffffL
        // or in the range 0xfff0000000000001L through 0xffffffffffffffffL, the result will be NaN. 
        public static bool IsNaN(double value)
        { 
            NanUnion t = new NanUnion(); 
            t.DoubleValue = value;
 
            UInt64 exp = t.UintValue & 0xfff0000000000000;
            UInt64 man = t.UintValue & 0x000fffffffffffff;

            return (exp == 0x7ff0000000000000 || exp == 0xfff0000000000000) && (man != 0); 
        }
#endif 
    } 
}

// File provided for Reference Use Only by Microsoft Corporation (c) 2007.
// Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
//
// Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.
//
// File: DoubleUtil.cs 
//
// Description: This file contains the implementation of DoubleUtil, which 
//              provides "fuzzy" comparison functionality for doubles and 
//              double-based classes and structs in our code.
// 
// History:
//  04/28/2003 : adsmith - Created
//  05/20/2003 : adsmith - Moved it to Shared, so Base, Core and Framework can all share.
// 
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
using System; 
using System.Windows;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices; 

#if WINDOWS_BASE
    using MS.Internal.WindowsBase;
#elif PRESENTATION_CORE 
    using MS.Internal.PresentationCore;
#elif PRESENTATIONFRAMEWORK 
    using MS.Internal.PresentationFramework; 
#elif DRT
    using MS.Internal.Drt; 
#else
#error Attempt to use FriendAccessAllowedAttribute from an unknown assembly.
using MS.Internal.YourAssemblyName;
#endif 

namespace MS.Internal 
{ 
    [FriendAccessAllowed]
    internal static class DoubleUtil 
    {
        // Const values come from sdk\inc\crt\float.h
        internal const double DBL_EPSILON  =   2.2204460492503131e-016; /* smallest such that 1.0+DBL_EPSILON != 1.0 */
        internal const float  FLT_MIN      =   1.175494351e-38F; /* Number close to zero, where float.MinValue is -float.MaxValue */ 

        ///  
        /// AreClose - Returns whether or not two doubles are "close".  That is, whether or 
        /// not they are within epsilon of each other.  Note that this epsilon is proportional
        /// to the numbers themselves to that AreClose survives scalar multiplication. 
        /// There are plenty of ways for this to return false even for numbers which
        /// are theoretically identical, so no code calling this should fail to work if this
        /// returns false.  This is important enough to repeat:
        /// NB: NO CODE CALLING THIS FUNCTION SHOULD DEPEND ON ACCURATE RESULTS - this should be 
        /// used for optimizations *only*.
        ///  
        ///  
        /// bool - the result of the AreClose comparision.
        ///  
        ///  The first double to compare. 
        ///  The second double to compare. 
        public static bool AreClose(double value1, double value2)
        { 
            //in case they are Infinities (then epsilon check does not work)
            if(value1 == value2) return true; 
            // This computes (|value1-value2| / (|value1| + |value2| + 10.0)) < DBL_EPSILON 
            double eps = (Math.Abs(value1) + Math.Abs(value2) + 10.0) * DBL_EPSILON;
            double delta = value1 - value2; 
            return(-eps < delta) && (eps > delta);
        }

        ///  
        /// LessThan - Returns whether or not the first double is less than the second double.
        /// That is, whether or not the first is strictly less than *and* not within epsilon of 
        /// the other number.  Note that this epsilon is proportional to the numbers themselves 
        /// to that AreClose survives scalar multiplication.  Note,
        /// There are plenty of ways for this to return false even for numbers which 
        /// are theoretically identical, so no code calling this should fail to work if this
        /// returns false.  This is important enough to repeat:
        /// NB: NO CODE CALLING THIS FUNCTION SHOULD DEPEND ON ACCURATE RESULTS - this should be
        /// used for optimizations *only*. 
        /// 
        ///  
        /// bool - the result of the LessThan comparision. 
        /// 
        ///  The first double to compare.  
        ///  The second double to compare. 
        public static bool LessThan(double value1, double value2)
        {
            return (value1 < value2) && !AreClose(value1, value2); 
        }
 
 
        /// 
        /// GreaterThan - Returns whether or not the first double is greater than the second double. 
        /// That is, whether or not the first is strictly greater than *and* not within epsilon of
        /// the other number.  Note that this epsilon is proportional to the numbers themselves
        /// to that AreClose survives scalar multiplication.  Note,
        /// There are plenty of ways for this to return false even for numbers which 
        /// are theoretically identical, so no code calling this should fail to work if this
        /// returns false.  This is important enough to repeat: 
        /// NB: NO CODE CALLING THIS FUNCTION SHOULD DEPEND ON ACCURATE RESULTS - this should be 
        /// used for optimizations *only*.
        ///  
        /// 
        /// bool - the result of the GreaterThan comparision.
        /// 
        ///  The first double to compare.  
        ///  The second double to compare. 
        public static bool GreaterThan(double value1, double value2) 
        { 
            return (value1 > value2) && !AreClose(value1, value2);
        } 

        /// 
        /// LessThanOrClose - Returns whether or not the first double is less than or close to
        /// the second double.  That is, whether or not the first is strictly less than or within 
        /// epsilon of the other number.  Note that this epsilon is proportional to the numbers
        /// themselves to that AreClose survives scalar multiplication.  Note, 
        /// There are plenty of ways for this to return false even for numbers which 
        /// are theoretically identical, so no code calling this should fail to work if this
        /// returns false.  This is important enough to repeat: 
        /// NB: NO CODE CALLING THIS FUNCTION SHOULD DEPEND ON ACCURATE RESULTS - this should be
        /// used for optimizations *only*.
        /// 
        ///  
        /// bool - the result of the LessThanOrClose comparision.
        ///  
        ///  The first double to compare.  
        ///  The second double to compare. 
        public static bool LessThanOrClose(double value1, double value2) 
        {
            return (value1 < value2) || AreClose(value1, value2);
        }
 
        /// 
        /// GreaterThanOrClose - Returns whether or not the first double is greater than or close to 
        /// the second double.  That is, whether or not the first is strictly greater than or within 
        /// epsilon of the other number.  Note that this epsilon is proportional to the numbers
        /// themselves to that AreClose survives scalar multiplication.  Note, 
        /// There are plenty of ways for this to return false even for numbers which
        /// are theoretically identical, so no code calling this should fail to work if this
        /// returns false.  This is important enough to repeat:
        /// NB: NO CODE CALLING THIS FUNCTION SHOULD DEPEND ON ACCURATE RESULTS - this should be 
        /// used for optimizations *only*.
        ///  
        ///  
        /// bool - the result of the GreaterThanOrClose comparision.
        ///  
        ///  The first double to compare. 
        ///  The second double to compare. 
        public static bool GreaterThanOrClose(double value1, double value2)
        { 
            return (value1 > value2) || AreClose(value1, value2);
        } 
 
        /// 
        /// IsOne - Returns whether or not the double is "close" to 1.  Same as AreClose(double, 1), 
        /// but this is faster.
        /// 
        /// 
        /// bool - the result of the AreClose comparision. 
        /// 
        ///  The double to compare to 1.  
        public static bool IsOne(double value) 
        {
            return Math.Abs(value-1.0) < 10.0 * DBL_EPSILON; 
        }

        /// 
        /// IsZero - Returns whether or not the double is "close" to 0.  Same as AreClose(double, 0), 
        /// but this is faster.
        ///  
        ///  
        /// bool - the result of the AreClose comparision.
        ///  
        ///  The double to compare to 0. 
        public static bool IsZero(double value)
        {
            return Math.Abs(value) < 10.0 * DBL_EPSILON; 
        }
 
        // The Point, Size, Rect and Matrix class have moved to WinCorLib.  However, we provide 
        // internal AreClose methods for our own use here.
 
        /// 
        /// Compares two points for fuzzy equality.  This function
        /// helps compensate for the fact that double values can
        /// acquire error when operated upon 
        /// 
        /// The first point to compare 
        /// The second point to compare 
        /// Whether or not the two points are equal
        public static bool AreClose(Point point1, Point point2) 
        {
            return DoubleUtil.AreClose(point1.X, point2.X) &&
            DoubleUtil.AreClose(point1.Y, point2.Y);
        } 

        ///  
        /// Compares two Size instances for fuzzy equality.  This function 
        /// helps compensate for the fact that double values can
        /// acquire error when operated upon 
        /// 
        /// The first size to compare
        /// The second size to compare
        /// Whether or not the two Size instances are equal 
        public static bool AreClose(Size size1, Size size2)
        { 
            return DoubleUtil.AreClose(size1.Width, size2.Width) && 
                   DoubleUtil.AreClose(size1.Height, size2.Height);
        } 

        /// 
        /// Compares two Vector instances for fuzzy equality.  This function
        /// helps compensate for the fact that double values can 
        /// acquire error when operated upon
        ///  
        /// The first Vector to compare 
        /// The second Vector to compare
        /// Whether or not the two Vector instances are equal 
        public static bool AreClose(System.Windows.Vector vector1, System.Windows.Vector vector2)
        {
            return DoubleUtil.AreClose(vector1.X, vector2.X) &&
                   DoubleUtil.AreClose(vector1.Y, vector2.Y); 
        }
 
        ///  
        /// Compares two rectangles for fuzzy equality.  This function
        /// helps compensate for the fact that double values can 
        /// acquire error when operated upon
        /// 
        /// The first rectangle to compare
        /// The second rectangle to compare 
        /// Whether or not the two rectangles are equal
        public static bool AreClose(Rect rect1, Rect rect2) 
        { 
            // If they're both empty, don't bother with the double logic.
            if (rect1.IsEmpty) 
            {
                return rect2.IsEmpty;
            }
 
            // At this point, rect1 isn't empty, so the first thing we can test is
            // rect2.IsEmpty, followed by property-wise compares. 
 
            return (!rect2.IsEmpty) &&
                DoubleUtil.AreClose(rect1.X, rect2.X) && 
                DoubleUtil.AreClose(rect1.Y, rect2.Y) &&
                DoubleUtil.AreClose(rect1.Height, rect2.Height) &&
                DoubleUtil.AreClose(rect1.Width, rect2.Width);
        } 

        ///  
        /// 
        /// 
        ///  
        /// 
        public static bool IsBetweenZeroAndOne(double val)
        {
            return (GreaterThanOrClose(val, 0) && LessThanOrClose(val, 1)); 
        }
 
        ///  
        ///
        ///  
        /// 
        /// 
        public static int DoubleToInt(double val)
        { 
            return (0 < val) ? (int)(val + 0.5) : (int)(val - 0.5);
        } 
 

        ///  
        /// rectHasNaN - this returns true if this rect has X, Y , Height or Width as NaN.
        /// 
        /// The rectangle to test
        /// returns whether the Rect has NaN 
        public static bool RectHasNaN(Rect r)
        { 
            if (    DoubleUtil.IsNaN(r.X) 
                 || DoubleUtil.IsNaN(r.Y)
                 || DoubleUtil.IsNaN(r.Height) 
                 || DoubleUtil.IsNaN(r.Width) )
            {
                return true;
            } 
            return false;
        } 
 

#if !PBTCOMPILER 

        [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
        private struct NanUnion
        { 
            [FieldOffset(0)] internal double DoubleValue;
            [FieldOffset(0)] internal UInt64 UintValue; 
        } 

        // The standard CLR double.IsNaN() function is approximately 100 times slower than our own wrapper, 
        // so please make sure to use DoubleUtil.IsNaN() in performance sensitive code.
        // PS item that tracks the CLR improvement is DevDiv Schedule : 26916.
        // IEEE 754 : If the argument is any value in the range 0x7ff0000000000001L through 0x7fffffffffffffffL
        // or in the range 0xfff0000000000001L through 0xffffffffffffffffL, the result will be NaN. 
        public static bool IsNaN(double value)
        { 
            NanUnion t = new NanUnion(); 
            t.DoubleValue = value;
 
            UInt64 exp = t.UintValue & 0xfff0000000000000;
            UInt64 man = t.UintValue & 0x000fffffffffffff;

            return (exp == 0x7ff0000000000000 || exp == 0xfff0000000000000) && (man != 0); 
        }
#endif 
    } 
}

// File provided for Reference Use Only by Microsoft Corporation (c) 2007.
// Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
                        

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