SystemColorTracker.cs source code in C# .NET

Source code for the .NET framework in C#

                        

Code:

/ Dotnetfx_Vista_SP2 / Dotnetfx_Vista_SP2 / 8.0.50727.4016 / DEVDIV / depot / DevDiv / releases / whidbey / NetFxQFE / ndp / fx / src / CommonUI / System / Drawing / Advanced / SystemColorTracker.cs / 1 / SystemColorTracker.cs

                            //------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 
// 
//     Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.
// 
//----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

namespace System.Drawing.Internal { 
 
    using System.Diagnostics;
    using System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis; 
    using System;
    using System.Drawing;
    using Microsoft.Win32;
    using System.Runtime.InteropServices; 
    using System.ComponentModel;
 
    // Keeps track of objects that need to be notified of system color change events. 
    // Mostly this means maintaining a list of weak references.
    internal class SystemColorTracker { 
        // when I tried the self host, it went over 500 but never over 1000.
        private static int INITIAL_SIZE = 200;
        // If it gets this big, I seriously miscalculated the performance of this object.
        private static int WARNING_SIZE = 100000; 
        private static float EXPAND_THRESHOLD = 0.75f;
        private static int EXPAND_FACTOR = 2; 
 
        private static WeakReference[] list = new WeakReference[INITIAL_SIZE];
        private static int count = 0; 
        private static bool addedTracker;

        // There's no such thing as a delegate to a static method,
        // so we need to create an instance of something. 
        private SystemColorTracker() {
        } 
 
        [SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Reliability", "CA2002:DoNotLockOnObjectsWithWeakIdentity")]
        internal static void Add(ISystemColorTracker obj) { 
            lock (typeof(SystemColorTracker)) {
                Debug.Assert(list != null, "List is null");
                Debug.Assert(list.Length > 0, "INITIAL_SIZE was initialized after list");
 
                if (list.Length == count) {
                    GarbageCollectList(); 
                } 

                if (!addedTracker) { 
                    addedTracker = true;
                    SystemEvents.UserPreferenceChanged += new UserPreferenceChangedEventHandler(OnUserPreferenceChanged);
                }
 
                // Strictly speaking, we should grab a lock on this class.  But since the chances
                // of a problem are so low, the consequences so minimal (something will get accidentally dropped 
                // from the list), and the performance of locking so lousy, we'll risk it. 
                int index = count;
                count++; 

                // COM+ takes forever to Finalize() weak references, so it pays to reuse them.
                if (list[index] == null)
                    list[index] = new WeakReference(obj); 
                else {
                    Debug.Assert(list[index].Target == null, "Trying to reuse a weak reference that isn't broken yet: list[" + index + "], length =" + list.Length); 
                    list[index].Target = obj; 
                }
            } 
        }

        private static void CleanOutBrokenLinks() {
            // Partition the list -- valid references in the low indices, broken references in the high indices. 
            // This is taken straight out of Sedgewick (p. 118 on quicksort).
 
            // Basic idea is to find a broken reference on the left side of the list, and swap it with 
            // a valid reference on the right
            int right = list.Length - 1; 
            int left = 0;

            int length = list.Length;
 
            // Loop invariant: everything to the left of "left" is a valid reference,
            // and anything to the right of "right" is broken. 
            for (;;) { 
                while (left < length && list[left].Target != null)
                    left++; 
                while (right >= 0 && list[right].Target == null)
                    right--;

                if (left >= right) { 
                    count = left;
                    break; 
                } 

                WeakReference temp = list[left]; 
                list[left] = list[right];
                list[right] = temp;

                left++; 
                right--;
            } 
 
            Debug.Assert(count >= 0 && count <= list.Length, "count not a legal index into list");
 
#if DEBUG
            // Check loop invariant.

            // We'd like to assert that any index < count contains a valid pointer, 
            // but since garbage collection can happen at any time, it may have been broken
            // after we partitioned it. 
            // 
            // for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
            //     Debug.Assert(list[i].Target != null, "Null found on the left side of the list"); 
            // }

            for (int i = count; i < list.Length; i++) {
                Debug.Assert(list[i].Target == null, "Partitioning didn't work"); 
            }
#endif 
        } 

        private static void GarbageCollectList() { 
            CleanOutBrokenLinks();

            if (count / (float) list.Length > EXPAND_THRESHOLD) {
                WeakReference[] newList = new WeakReference[list.Length * EXPAND_FACTOR]; 
                list.CopyTo(newList, 0);
                list = newList; 
 
                if (list.Length >= WARNING_SIZE) {
                    Debug.Fail("SystemColorTracker is using way more memory than expected."); 
                }
            }
        }
 
        private static void OnUserPreferenceChanged(object sender, UserPreferenceChangedEventArgs e) {
 
            // Update pens and brushes 
            if (e.Category == UserPreferenceCategory.Color) {
                for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) { 
                    Debug.Assert(list[i] != null, "null value in active part of list");
                    ISystemColorTracker tracker = (ISystemColorTracker) list[i].Target;
                    if (tracker != null) {
                        // If object still around 
                        tracker.OnSystemColorChanged();
                    } 
                } 
            }
        } 
    }
}

 

// File provided for Reference Use Only by Microsoft Corporation (c) 2007.
//------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 
// 
//     Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.
// 
//----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

namespace System.Drawing.Internal { 
 
    using System.Diagnostics;
    using System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis; 
    using System;
    using System.Drawing;
    using Microsoft.Win32;
    using System.Runtime.InteropServices; 
    using System.ComponentModel;
 
    // Keeps track of objects that need to be notified of system color change events. 
    // Mostly this means maintaining a list of weak references.
    internal class SystemColorTracker { 
        // when I tried the self host, it went over 500 but never over 1000.
        private static int INITIAL_SIZE = 200;
        // If it gets this big, I seriously miscalculated the performance of this object.
        private static int WARNING_SIZE = 100000; 
        private static float EXPAND_THRESHOLD = 0.75f;
        private static int EXPAND_FACTOR = 2; 
 
        private static WeakReference[] list = new WeakReference[INITIAL_SIZE];
        private static int count = 0; 
        private static bool addedTracker;

        // There's no such thing as a delegate to a static method,
        // so we need to create an instance of something. 
        private SystemColorTracker() {
        } 
 
        [SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Reliability", "CA2002:DoNotLockOnObjectsWithWeakIdentity")]
        internal static void Add(ISystemColorTracker obj) { 
            lock (typeof(SystemColorTracker)) {
                Debug.Assert(list != null, "List is null");
                Debug.Assert(list.Length > 0, "INITIAL_SIZE was initialized after list");
 
                if (list.Length == count) {
                    GarbageCollectList(); 
                } 

                if (!addedTracker) { 
                    addedTracker = true;
                    SystemEvents.UserPreferenceChanged += new UserPreferenceChangedEventHandler(OnUserPreferenceChanged);
                }
 
                // Strictly speaking, we should grab a lock on this class.  But since the chances
                // of a problem are so low, the consequences so minimal (something will get accidentally dropped 
                // from the list), and the performance of locking so lousy, we'll risk it. 
                int index = count;
                count++; 

                // COM+ takes forever to Finalize() weak references, so it pays to reuse them.
                if (list[index] == null)
                    list[index] = new WeakReference(obj); 
                else {
                    Debug.Assert(list[index].Target == null, "Trying to reuse a weak reference that isn't broken yet: list[" + index + "], length =" + list.Length); 
                    list[index].Target = obj; 
                }
            } 
        }

        private static void CleanOutBrokenLinks() {
            // Partition the list -- valid references in the low indices, broken references in the high indices. 
            // This is taken straight out of Sedgewick (p. 118 on quicksort).
 
            // Basic idea is to find a broken reference on the left side of the list, and swap it with 
            // a valid reference on the right
            int right = list.Length - 1; 
            int left = 0;

            int length = list.Length;
 
            // Loop invariant: everything to the left of "left" is a valid reference,
            // and anything to the right of "right" is broken. 
            for (;;) { 
                while (left < length && list[left].Target != null)
                    left++; 
                while (right >= 0 && list[right].Target == null)
                    right--;

                if (left >= right) { 
                    count = left;
                    break; 
                } 

                WeakReference temp = list[left]; 
                list[left] = list[right];
                list[right] = temp;

                left++; 
                right--;
            } 
 
            Debug.Assert(count >= 0 && count <= list.Length, "count not a legal index into list");
 
#if DEBUG
            // Check loop invariant.

            // We'd like to assert that any index < count contains a valid pointer, 
            // but since garbage collection can happen at any time, it may have been broken
            // after we partitioned it. 
            // 
            // for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
            //     Debug.Assert(list[i].Target != null, "Null found on the left side of the list"); 
            // }

            for (int i = count; i < list.Length; i++) {
                Debug.Assert(list[i].Target == null, "Partitioning didn't work"); 
            }
#endif 
        } 

        private static void GarbageCollectList() { 
            CleanOutBrokenLinks();

            if (count / (float) list.Length > EXPAND_THRESHOLD) {
                WeakReference[] newList = new WeakReference[list.Length * EXPAND_FACTOR]; 
                list.CopyTo(newList, 0);
                list = newList; 
 
                if (list.Length >= WARNING_SIZE) {
                    Debug.Fail("SystemColorTracker is using way more memory than expected."); 
                }
            }
        }
 
        private static void OnUserPreferenceChanged(object sender, UserPreferenceChangedEventArgs e) {
 
            // Update pens and brushes 
            if (e.Category == UserPreferenceCategory.Color) {
                for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) { 
                    Debug.Assert(list[i] != null, "null value in active part of list");
                    ISystemColorTracker tracker = (ISystemColorTracker) list[i].Target;
                    if (tracker != null) {
                        // If object still around 
                        tracker.OnSystemColorChanged();
                    } 
                } 
            }
        } 
    }
}

 

// File provided for Reference Use Only by Microsoft Corporation (c) 2007.
                        

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